Edibles And Concentrates Are Red-Hot, According To Latest Numbers

Colorado's legal cannabis sales continue to smash records, mainly because of the increased interest in concentrates and edibles. Dispensary sales in April surged by 58 percent over the same period previous year, according to Boulder-based BDS Analytics.

What's more, the monthly sales of $117-million beat last December's record $101-million in sales.

"Every significant category contributed to April's robust growth," BDS Analytics, which tracks cannabis sales across the country, said in the release, adding that retail dollars and units sold rose substantially across the industry. Edibles sales saw an 83 percent increase over last April to $13-million. Sales of flower grew to $67-million, and concentrates reached $27 million - a staggering 133-percent growth.

"The rapid growth in concentrates and edibles is the continuation of a two-year trend, as consumers increasingly prefer alternative consumption methods to smoking," BDS Analytics CEO Roy Bingham told Civilized in an e-mail.

"Since all such products are branded," Bingham explains, "it marks a steady shift toward more conventionally marketed products, which now represent over 40 percent of sales, double their market share only two years ago."

With all the new offerings on the market, it's little surprise that flower sales have waned slightly: bud itself has gone from making up 71 percent of total sales in Colorado last year, to just 58 percent this year.

Latest.

I've been covering cannabis for nearly five years, and by now I'm all too accustomed to the impersonal cannabis conference at a stuffy, generic hotel or expo hall, brimming with white guys in suits, and generally lacking in the spirit of well, cannabis. (The woes of legalization, I suppose.) So it was a breath of fresh air when I walked into what felt like a giant atrium in downtown LA for a new kind of cannabis conference. Located in what's called the Valentine Grass Room in an industrial area past the hustle and bustle of the DTLA skyscrapers, Microscopes & Machines (M&M) boasted a diverse array of speakers, from doctors and lawyers to chemists and cultivators on the frontlines of the cannabis industry.

Can we see some ID please?

You must be 19 years of age or older to enter.