It's no surprise when people run to the aid of embattled leaders like Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, who has been under intense fire after a tape surfaced of him making disturbing remarks about women. But not everyone is making a good case for giving The Donald a second chance. Here are the worst attempts at damage control for the Republican nominee, including Trump's own efforts to defend himself.

1. Jon Voigt's friendly fire

The Academy Award winning actor was one of the first personalities to rush to The Donald's defence last week. And his support could not have been more tone deaf. Voigt was ashamed of the language being used in the 2016 campaign. But he wasn't talking about the Trump tape. He was talking about Robert De Niro's criticism of The Donald.

 

Kinda hard to pick one tweet in that chain to quibble with. But we'll go with the idea that Trump spoke like any immature 59-year-old when he made those comments in 2005. Oh, to be young and foolish again.

2. Scott Baio tells women to "grow up"

Trump supporters like New Jersey Governor Chris Christie had the sense to distance themselves from the leader's obscene remarks while defending his candidacy for president. But that wasn't the case with Scott Baio. The former Happy Days star actually endorsed Trump's disgusting language. 

"I like Trump because Trump is not a politician," he said last Sunday on FOX News. "He talks like a guy. And ladies out there, this is what guys talk about when you're not around. So if you're offended by it, grow up. Okay?"

He also accused women of being just as crass as The Donald. "And by the way, this is what you guys talk about over white wine when you have your brunches."

So there you have it. Trump's language wasn't locker-room talk. It was bistro banter. 

3. Macho Man Pat Robertson

The former Baptist minister and media mogul defended Trump's lewd remarks by saying they weren't sincere. The Donald was just posturing when he talked about assaulting women, according to Robertson. 

"Let's face it, a guy does something 11 years ago as part of a conversation in Hollywood where he's trying to look like he's macho." That's how Robertson summarized the scandal last week on The 700 Club. He also likened The Donald to a phoenix that will rise from the ashes of this scandal. Maybe, but right now it looks like his hopes of becoming president were a flash in the pan.

4. Ben Carson praises Democratic Party solidarity

Retired neurosurgeon and former 2016 Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson also went on FOX News last week to defend The Donald. He told Megyn Kelly that Americans need to ignore the lewd tape controversy so that they can focus on more important issues facing America.

"When you're about to go off the cliff, you've got to take measures to make sure you don't go off the cliff. And then you deal with the other things," he said.

But then he suggested that America was doomed to go off that cliff because of problems with Republican leadership. When Kelly asked Carson why Trump began attacking his own party after consolidating support with a solid performance at the second presidential debate, the doctor gave a bleak prognosis on the 2016 election.

"It's well known that the Republican Party always finds a way to snatch defeat out of the jaws of victory. Hopefully we can avoid it this time."

And his prescription was to steal a page from the Democratic Party's playbook. "You'll notice that the Democrats disagree too, but they march lockstep. And it's so important. I wish the Republicans could learn that lesson. It's so critical."

5. Trump's most inept defender is, of course, himself

Mere hours after effectively declaring war on the Republican Party via Twitter, Trump appeared on The O'Rielly Factor to discuss his embattled campaign - especially the toxic rift growing in the GOP. 

"I think I'm better off without their support," Trump said of House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senator John McCain and other members of the Republican establishment. O'Rielly wondered how Trump would work with them if he became president and they returned to Congress. 

"Do you think they're all going to cooperate with you after you're trashing them?"

"I get along with people...I'll get along with them."

But he couldn't stop himself from getting one more barb in. "[McCain] was begging for my endorsement [during Arizona's primary]...and then, at the first sign of a little bit of difficulty, he un-endorses. I wouldn't want to be in a foxhole with a lot of these people."