As we learn more about the minor cannabinoid tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), you may have asked “does THCV get you high?” and not gotten a clear answer. The short answer is yes, THCV is a psychoactive compound that does indeed get you high, particularly when taken in large doses, but the limited research we have on the subject tells us that the compound exhibits various physiological effects over the body that are different than the famous the “stoned” feeling that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces.

To give you an idea of what kind of mind and mood-altering properties this cannabinoid offers, here we talk about the “high” you'll likely experience from THCV. However, it's important to remember that everyone has a unique reaction to cannabis and not everyone will experience a high from THCV in the same way.

  • THCV is known to generally instill a clear-headed, stimulating buzz and provide a burst of mental energy. The lucid high THCV provides is good for consumers looking for something to use during the day.
  • It has been shown that THCV intensifies the cerebral euphoria brought on by THC. The difference is so noticeable that the high from THCV is described as a race car compared to the high from THC. However, it may be too sensational for some people and cause anxiety.
  • THCV shows evidence of counteracting many of the negative feelings (such as paranoia and short-term memory impairment) brought on by the high from THC. It may even be able to help regulate heart rates that increase from the effects of a THC experience.
  • THCV does get you high, but it doesn't give you “the munchies” that famously goes with getting stoned. The compound is a known appetite suppressant, so people with eating disorders or who are trying to gain weight should avoid strains with high levels of THCV.
  • The high from THCV comes on quicker than feelings brought on by THC, and it only lasts about half as long as the buzz from THC. The fast onset and quick dissipation of the high makes it desirable for cannabis users looking for short-lived cerebral experiences.