With the recent hurricanes hitting Caribbean islands and the southern United States, people seem reluctant (at least in America) to discuss the increasing dangers of climate change. But while the U.S. may not be taking action, other countries are stepping up to the plate and making drastic changes to reduce their carbon emissions. The biggest policy change? Banning fossil fueled cars.

In the past year, seven countries announced their plans to stop the use of fossil fueled cars. While these countries all have different deadlines (or no set deadline, in some cases), simply beginning to phase out these vehicles will dramatically reduce carbon emissions. Here are the seven countries:

1. Norway

Norway is one of the strictest when it comes to carbon emissions. By 2025, petrol-powered cars will be completely banned and only 100 percent electric or plug-in hybrids will be sold in the country. They also announced by 2030, 75 percent of buses, 50 percent of trucks and 40 percent of short seas shipping boats should be zero emission.

2. Germany

Last year, Germany's legislature approved a bill that would ban all combustion engine cars by 2030. Citizens would only be allowed to buy electric or hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Germany's been at the forefront at combating climate change. About 35 percent of their energy is currently produced by renewables, and they've instituted plans to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent in 2020 and 95 percent in 2050.

3. India

As a developing nation that's quickly industrializing, India's been a country whose greenhouse gases have increased greatly in recent years. To combat this, the government announced that only electric cars will be sold in the country starting in 2030.

4. France

To ensure the country meets its promises from the Paris Climate Agreement, France announced that they will ban the sale of petrol and disease cars in 2040. Until then, they will implement policies to phase out those cars and promote electric and hybrid vehicles.

5. United Kingdom

Fears have recently arrived in the UK surrounding nitrogen oxide, a gas created by vehicle emissions that presents a major risk to public health. This led to a banning of all petrol vehicles by 2040. They also announced a £3 billion (about $4 million in the U.S.) program to tackle dirty air on public roads.

6 and 7. China and the Netherlands

Both China and the Netherlands have announced plans to eliminate fossil-fueled cars, but have yet to set dates for those policies. The Netherlands is currently targeting 2025 for its plan, but China has not suggested a date. But as one of the world's largest emitters of greenhouse gases, China's begun to promote more policies to combat climate change in recent years, which is an extremely encouraging sign.