When looking for a new job, the hardest part is making an attractive résumé. What information should you include, how far back should you go, what type of font should you use, do you put the accent on both e's or just the last one, etc. How to do you convey your entire professional experience into one document?

The website Comparably collected the seven biggest mistakes people make when writing their résumés, and they also gave tips on how to fix them. Here's what they said:

1. Using a Cool But Hard to Read Font

You want your résumé to stand out and look cool, so you use some fancy font. Unfortunately, these can be harder to read than normal fonts. Just go with one of the generic fonts you see everywhere.

2. Putting Jobs from Oldest to Newest

When listing jobs on your résumé, you should put your most recent work experience at the top since it's the most relevant. It's more important for your prospective employer.

3. Not Including a Summary or Objective

A summary or objective can make it easier for a hiring manager to know if you're the right fit. Saying, "Writer with eight years experience," tells the manager if you're qualified for the job right away.

4. Putting Awards and Distinctions in Different Categories

You might put awards or honors you've received inside different categories. Like an award you won could be in the description of one of your previous jobs. It's actually better to just create a separate category and list all your awards in that section instead, to make sure that the hiring managers actually see your honors.

5. Leaving No White Space

You want to make your résumé as concise and short as possible, so you cram everything in on one page. But actually this can make it harder to read and may turn a hiring manager off.

6. Including Irrelevant Information

This sort of goes with putting your oldest jobs first, but you don't need to include things that are relevant to the possible job on your résumé. It's great that you walked dogs to make money in high school, but it's probably not going to help you get a job at a law firm, so just leave it off.

7. Not Sending It as a .PDF

The thing about word docs is that everyone has a different version of it, so what a Word doc looks like on your computer may look weird on someone else's. It's safer to just send a .PDF so it doesn't have weird formatting.

(h/t Comparably)