Colorado Congressional Members Assured They Shouldn’t Expect Marijuana Prosecutions To Rise

Members of Colorado congressional delegation say they were reassured by their state’s U.S. Attorney that the disappearance of Obama-era marijuana guidance will not result in increasing marijuana prosecutions at the expense of other matters.

Colorado’s U.S. Attorney Bob Troyer on Thursday told seven members of the Colorado congressional delegation that his office will not step up marijuana-related prosecutions at the expense of other matters such as immigration, the opioid crisis and violent crime, according to a statement released Friday by the office of Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo.

Troyer could not be immediately reached Friday for comment.

On Jan. 4, uncertainty swelled in the cannabis industry following Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ removal of the Cole Memo and related marijuana-guidance, which laid out that enforcement priorities should not be focused on state-legal marijuana regimes. Sessions’ new guidance put the onus on federal prosecutors as to the extent they’d utilize federal resources for marijuana enforcement.

Read the rest of this story at The Cannabist.

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On Flatbush Avenue, tucked amidst the nexus of four iconic Brooklyn neighborhoods (Park Slope, Boerum Hill, Fort Greene, and Prospect Heights), medical cannabis company Citiva opened up their newest location at the turn of the new year. Walking through the shiny glass door, you’re first struck by the sleek tidiness of the front lobby. Both the dispensary's resident pharmacist and receptionist greet visitors as they clear patients (as does any medical dispensary in the country) before allowing them through to the retail room.

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