Warning: Your Morning Wake-Me-Up Is Deadlier Than Marijuana

That dripping you hear from the coffee maker every morning might sound like the fresh pot finishing up. But it's actually the sound of you knocking on death's door - one sip at a time of the potentially deadly brew. 

Overdosing on caffeine can can cause jitteriness, agitation, migraines and even death. And it doesn't take a huge amount to hit that potentially lethal threshold. For the average person, the risk of suffering cardiac arrest goes up by 44 percent after consuming 687 milligrams of coffee's perky ingredient.

That might seem like a lot. But keep in mind that a Grande-sized cup of Pike Place coffee from Starbucks contains about 310 milligrams of caffeine - roughly half the amount it takes to jeopardize your heart health. So that mermaid on the cup is basically a scaly angel of death.

Brewing at home doesn't make things much better. A mug of Maxwell House Light contains between 50-100 mg. of caffeine. That means a one-pound container has roughly enough caffeine to kill you and a friend over breakfast. So your next brunch date could turn into a suicide pact if you're not careful.

In contrast, marijuana has never caused a fatal overdose - ever. That means people in legal states have more reason to fear their baristas than their local budtenders.

So don't buy into the 'Reefer Madness' rhetoric of politicians like Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who says marijuana is "only slightly less awful" than heroin. But do be careful when your server asks to refill your mug at the diner because she might be topping up the dirt on an early grave.

For other common household things that are more dangerous than cannabis, check out our feature on the insidious killer lurking in your sink and the the deadly powder lurking in your spice rack.

Latest.

As medical marijuana continues to gain ground across the US, more and more colleges are adding cannabis to their curriculum. In fact, more than half of America's pharmaceutical schools (62 percent) now teach students about medical marijuana according to a new survey conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's School of Pharmacy. "With more states legalizing medical marijuana, student pharmacists must be prepared to effectively care for their patients who may use medical marijuana alone or in combination with prescription or over-the-counter medications," the study's authors wrote.