More and more responsible, well-adjusted parents are opening up about their cannabis consumption, saying the drug's anxiety-reducing, patience-increasing effects benefit both them and the kids.

But c'mon: is parenting while high really a good idea?

We looked at The Guardian's informal survey of pot-smoking dads and moms that included people from North America and the UK to help establish some ground rules. However, if you have any doubts whatsoever about your ability to be responsible for the life of your tiny human while high, the choice is simple: don't do it.

Wait until their bedtime

"I go out into the garage when everyone else is drinking beers or wine or cocktails," says Rob, 59, from Washington. "One must always keep in mind there is a time and place for things. That is the real issue. If it is not a time to drink, it is not a time to smoke. That keeps things pretty even."

"I do not smoke near my daughter," says Tannis from Nova Scotia. "I smoke in a room at the top of the house well away from her. It allows me to be more patient and less irritable. Smoking cannabis during the day makes me less active and I don't play as much as I normally would. So I like to keep it to a night thing."

Have age-appropriate conversations

"We never, ever would allow our kid (age 12.5) to know we occasionally partake," says Max, 51, from Los Angeles. "It's not impossible that once he's quite a lot older (18?), we might be a little less shy about it, but it seems unlikely to me at this point. We have, once or twice, eaten a cookie or something when out at a music festival or lounging by the pool in a hotel while he is with us, but we would never get "totally baked". I'm a control freak so I'd never be comfortable being really stoned and unable to cope with what might come up when he's around."

Know thyself

If you're prone to feeling spaced out or paranoid, parenting on pot is a total no. But seasoned users - who know they feel blissed-out and focused while high - claim it improves their parenting.

"I regret not smoking more when my daughter was little," Paul in Aberdeen, Scotland tells the Guardian. "Not every day, obviously, but at weekends. Whenever I did smoke I was much more aware of what she was saying to me, and much better able to go with the flow of the games we played. Marijuana seems to me to be a 'total interest' drug, which locates you in the here and now. I'm a relaxed person anyway, but there's always an element of impatience and self preoccupation about un-stoned people, I find. I don't smoke now BTW."

The enormous expectations our culture places on parents means they may continue to keep mum about their pot-smoking preferences. But the anecdotal evidence, at least, suggests cannabis has the mom seal of approval.

h/t The Guardian, The Cannabist, Cosmopolitan