Cannabis activist and lawyer Ulrich Richter is trying to push the legalization of cannabis through the Mexican Supreme Court, according to Herb. In Mexico the courts have similar powers for enacting laws as politicians do, which means that Richter's case could be a potential answer to the lack of interest in legalizing marijuana on the political end.

Mexico's top court will begin to discuss Richter's case on April 11. His main argument is that cannabis prohibition violates the human right of 'free development of personality.' That claim is supported by Supreme Court Judge Jorge Mario Pardo, and the right in question is recognized both by the country of Mexico and the UN's Declaration of Human Rights, so the case definitely has some muscle.

If Richter is successful, he will be able to grow and consume marijuana legally. However, the fight will continue for other Mexicans who want the right to use marijuana.

Unlike in the US, a single ruling in the Mexican courts will not be enough to enact a law. Five rulings are needed to create a national precedent. Richter is hopeful that his will be the second of the required five. An activist group called SMART won a case using the same argument back in 2015 and Richter aims to recreate their success.

This strategy was the same one used to legalize gay marriage in 2015.

Richter's evocation of the UN's Declaration of Human Rights could also lead to changes to marijuana legislation on an international level as well.