Canada is set to legalize marijuana later this year, and many people are discussing how the new laws will affect border crossings with the United States. And while it may be obvious to not transport cannabis over the border, apparently you're not even allowed to talk about the drug as well.

The Washington Post ran an article about how Canada legalizing marijuana will create a ton of confusion and controversy in regards to their border with the United States. And while the article hit on some obvious points, such as not trying to transport cannabis across the border, they also mentioned that Canadians can be barred for entering the United States for their entire lives for simply admitting to prior marijuana use.

The newspaper told the story of Jessica Goldstein, who lives two miles north of the U.S. border in British Columbia, who went to Washington to see a concert. At the border, she and her friends were asked if they ever used drugs and Goldstein admitted to smoking marijuana in the past, assuming it would not be a big deal.

Goldstein is now barred from entering the United States for the rest of her life.

One immigrant attorney testified in front of his country's senate that current Canadian President Justin Trudeau would probably be barred from entering the United States once he leaves office since he's admitted to using marijuana in the past.

There's something a little messed up when simply admitting to using marijuana, which the previous three U.S. presidents prior to Donald Trump have done, can lead to a lifetime ban from a country.

Canadian officials have said they want to work with American authorities to change border procedures to avoid this situation, but the U.S. government has not wavered and says they will continue their policies. 

Perhaps when Attorney General Jeff Sessions inevitably quits or gets fired the United States can adopt a new semi-sane border policy.

(h/t Washington Post)