While we know the stereotype of a stoner is not accurate nowadays, we don’t really have a clear picture about who it is that actually uses cannabis.

Civilized recently teamed up with PSB Research to conduct a poll of over 1,000 Americans to get their thoughts and feelings about marijuana. Some of the people interviewed were cannabis users, and we can use the data collected from them to get an idea about what the average cannabis user in the United States looks like.

The average marijuana user in the United States is in their 30’s living in either the South or West, which isn’t very surprising considering every state that currently has legal cannabis is located near the West Coast. They also live in a major city, or at the very least in a suburb very close to one. They’re also most likely a man, as 57 percent of users in our survey were male, and white.

The average American marijuana user works either full or part-time, but is almost certainly making less than $75,000 each year. They also vote for Democrats in elections, even if they personally identify as “independent,” and identify as either moderate or liberal politically. Again, probably not too surprising considering people who vote for Republicans tend to be more conservative and therefore would have a more negative opinion of cannabis.

There are some factors that were not really a factor when it comes to marijuana use. For instance, when it comes to education there was a nearly a one-third split in marijuana users between high school education or less, some college/technical school and college degree. There was also nearly a 50/50 split as to whether marijuana users were married or not. But regardless if they’re married or not, they do not have any children living in their house.

So essentially the average American marijuana user is a white man in his 30’s with no children living near or in a major city with no children and a middle-class job and did not vote for Donald Trump in the 2016 election.

Perhaps as more states legalize marijuana and therefore more people began using cannabis, we’ll see a more complex version of the average American marijuana user who more closely resembles the average American as well.