The most titillating merger in the history of politics happened in Australia last week, when two fringe groups announced the creation of the Sex/Marijuana Party - a merger designed to help political outliers win more seats in this summer's federal election.

The coalition is based on the Sex Party and the Hemp Party. The former was established in 2009 to fight censorship and advocate on behalf of the sex industry. While those issues remain the group's forte, they have also branched out into advocating for issues like marriage equality and prison reform. And they're no strangers to causing a stir. In a May 30 press release, the party addressed anti-Islam protestors by saying, "Take your messages of hate – and piss off!"

The Hemp party was founded in 1993 to combat marijuana prohibition. Their goal is not only to make marijuana legal but to also make it more socially acceptable than alcohol, party spokesman Andrew Kavasilas told The Guardian.

"If marijuana were to replace alcohol as the major social tonic in society, there would be less aggression on the streets, lower road tolls, less domestic violence, better sleeping patterns, more creative work output and less vomit on the streets."

Fiona Patten - an incumbent Member of Parliament for the Sex Party - is looking forward to campaigning for legalization, which she says many Australian legislators support privately. But they don't raise the issue for fear of political ramifications.

"Every single ex-member of parliament I speak to says, it's just ridiculous, the war on drugs, we should just legalise it, tax it, regulate it," she told The Guardian.

"Privately, I get a lot of support in parliament but they're all too risk averse, they're all scared....I'm not a conspiracy theorist but if you were to legalise it, you may put a dent in big pharma, you may put dent in the alcohol industry, so I worry if there's pressure for those industries to stop the tide."

Meanwhile, both parties also support arts and culture. "We've got strong arts policies and we certainly support rock 'n' roll," Patten said.

You can learn more about their sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll platform in this overview from The Guardian.