It must be hard to be an anti-marijuana group. With so many studies and reports coming out showing how cannabis is actually beneficial and how none of the negatives they've advertised have come to fruition, it's hard to make a legitimate argument against legalization. So what do you do? Take a positive fact and pretend it's negative.

A recent survey showed that marijuana use among Colorado teens has dropped in the past two years, and the rates are actually lower than they were pre-legalization. You'd think this would be a tough fact for anti-marijuana groups, but apparently not. An anti-cannabis group called "Smart Colorado" took that same survey and pointed out that in that same time frame the percentage of adults 18-25 who use marijuana has gone up!

What Smart Colorado doesn't point out is that marijuana use among 18 to 25 year olds went from 31.75 percent to 32.2 percent, a 1.4 percent difference that is within the margin of error for the survey and is considered statistically insignificant. So really the data says the rates are more or less the same.

But even if it didn't grow, those numbers are still concerning for Smart Colorado. As they point out, the rate of use among 18 to 25 year olds is "the third highest rate in the nation." Of course, considering there are currently only five states in the nation with legal marijuana, it's probably not that surprising that Colorado would have one of the higher rates.

Smart Colorado does mention that the human brain doesn't fully develop until a person turns 25. So they argue that having such a high rate of users could be damaging mental health of young adults in the state. Of course, they don't mention that the same could be said of alcohol or opioids or any number of other substances that marijuana can actually reduce the use of.

Luckily, Smart Colorado's arguments don't seem to be landing much in Colorado. Although they'd probably argue that's only because everyone's too high.

(h/t Westword)