Adult marijuana consumption is fast on the rise in the United States. The number of Americans who identify themselves as cannabis users has nearly doubled over the last three years, according to a recent Gallup Poll that found 13 percent of respondents said they used marijuana. That's up from seven percent in 2013. 

Meanwhile, 43 percent of Americans reported that they have at least tried marijuana - up from 38 percent in 2013. And it's significantly higher than in 1969, when only four percent of adult Americans said they had tried cannabis. So today's Americans are hipper than the hippies.

Contrary to what anti-marijuana advocates say about legalization leading to increased consumption among teens, the recent poll found that usage skews toward middle-aged Americans. Half of adults 30-49 years old and 48 percent of people 50-64 have at least tried cannabis. According to Gallup, those demographics aren't more likely to use it. 

Among the demographics polled, diehard churchgoers are among the least likely to join your smoking circle. Only two percent of people attending church on a weekly basis said they use marijuana. So the cannabis industry can't pull a John Lennon and say it's bigger than Jesus. But they can say that cannabis is bigger than atheism and agnosticism. According to Pew Research's findings, only seven percent of Americans identify themselves as agnostic or atheist. 

To conduct the poll, Gallup contacted 1,023 American adults in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. For more on their findings, check out this press release.

You should also revisit our stories from the Civilized Cannabis Culture Poll in April, which also reflected the growing number of cannabis consumers and support for legalization in the U.S., even amongst people who don't consume marijuana themselves.