If All Hallows' Eve is a holiday that's very near and dear to you, then read no further. Today we're discussing 5 things you didn't want to know about Halloween

1. R.I.P. Hunger

Americans are expected to spend a whopping total of $9.1 billion on Halloween in 2017 alone. That includes money for costumes, candy, party accessories and other fixings. But if they skipped those festive expenses, they could help lay hunger to rest.

That $9.1 billion would be enough to feed roughly 1,246,575 people three meals a day for a year (based on estimate from Daily Kos). So would you rather fill trick-or-treat bags for one night or over a million stomachs for a year?

2. Sugar-saurus

A big chunk of that $9.1 billion in Halloween expenses goes to the estimated 600 million pounds of candy sold in the Untied States every October. That's over 150 million pounds more than the Willis (Sears) Tower weighs.

Or put it another way, that amount of candy is roughly the same weight as a herd of 2,820 titanosaurs known as Argentinosaurus — the heaviest dinosaur ever discovered.

3. Psychedelic Swiffers

Ever wonder why witches ride brooms? It's to get high, of course, and we're not talking about altitude.

According to one explanation, the broom was the joint of its day — a method to deliver a recreational high. But instead of smoking weed, medieval Europeans tripped out on an herbal compound made of nightshade, hemlock, and other ingredients that caused LSD-like hallucinations. But the compound also caused extreme nausea and vomiting if ingested orally.

So those medieval hippies got around that by absorbing it through sweat glands after rubbing the compound into their armpits, or through mucous membranes by smearing it onto a broomstick and inserting it into the vaginal canal. Either way, the drug was said to create a high that made people feel like they were flying.

4. Ghost Spiders

Superstitious folk shouldn't kill spiders on Halloween because those aren't ordinary arachnids, according to one folk tradition. Spiders spotted on October 31st are actually the spirits of deceased friends saying hello. Or saying "screw you" if all your friends know you're a huge arachnophobe. 

5. Bobbing for Injuries

Bobbing for apples (a.k.a. 'apple ducking,' a.k.a. 'Halloween waterboarding') is one of the oldest traditions around October 31. And it's also one of the more hazardous activities, according to eye doctors who say that they treat patients every year for scratched corneas, eye-bleeds and other injuries caused by apple bobbing. 

And even if you bob cautiously, you're still at risk for contracting eye infections if the water's dirty. So wear goggles this year unless you want to bob for pink eye.