3 Myths About Cannabis And Sex

Dozens of myths surround cannabis, but in recent years some rumors about some strange effects that cannabis can have in the bedroom have cropped up. Here are a few myths about the effects of cannabis on sexuality that, despite not holding any scientific weight, are still floating around.


1. Cannabis Triggers Homosexuality


Over the years, some stories have popped up (mainly on the internet) claiming that cannabis is causing straight men to experiment with homosexuality. These are strictly rumored anecdotal accounts, as there is no scientific evidence at all to back up these claims. It may just be that cannabis allows some people to act on impulses they may never indulge while sober, as it lowers inhibitions and often increases one's sensual feelings and might act as an aphrodisiac.

2. Cannabis Sterilizes Men


Although it's true that frequent cannabis use can cause poor behavior and morphology (the size and shape) in sperm, marijuana can in no way sterilize a man. These negative impacts aren't seen as a widespread problem among male cannabis users, but studies have shown a range of negative effects marijuana can have on sperm such as abnormal shape and size, which reduces their ability to swim and fertilize an egg.

For example, in 2014 a research team from the Universities of Sheffield and Manchester conducted a study on how common lifestyle factors influence sperm morphology which found “risk factors for poor sperm morphology, after adjustment for centre and other risk factors, included: (i) sample production in summer; and (ii) use of cannabis in the 3 months prior to sample collection in men aged ≤30 years.” However, the good news is that any infertility (not the same as sterilization) is temporary, as the study noted “men who produced a sample after 6 days abstinence were less likely” to produce abnormal sperm.

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3. Cannabis Prolongs Arousal


Some cannabis users report a prolonged sense of arousal and sensual pleasures (even lengthened orgasms) while having sex under the herb's influence. However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. As the University of California Santa Barbara notes, these feelings are generally attributed to a distorted, skewed sense of time one can experience while under cannabis' influence, and not physical feelings of arousal and pleasure actually being prolonged.

For more debunked cannabis myths, click here.

Latest.

As medical marijuana continues to gain ground across the US, more and more colleges are adding cannabis to their curriculum. In fact, more than half of America's pharmaceutical schools (62 percent) now teach students about medical marijuana according to a new survey conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's School of Pharmacy. "With more states legalizing medical marijuana, student pharmacists must be prepared to effectively care for their patients who may use medical marijuana alone or in combination with prescription or over-the-counter medications," the study's authors wrote.